The Grunt Fund Calculator

Check Out the Pie Slicer!

Manage the contributions of  your whole team using the online Pie Slicer software. The Pie Slicer tracks inputs from team members and applies the Slicing Pie formula.



To help you form your very own Grunt Fund, I have created an Excel spreadsheet that calculates slices of pie based on the model in the book.

Download the Grunt Fund Calculator

 Download the Grunt Fund Calculator – Expanded to accommodate up to 20 Grunts!

The video below provide a quick explanation on using the calculator.


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  • http://www.caremonkey.com Troy Westley

    ‘Slicing Pie’ is fantastic because it is fair and makes sense and avoids the mistakes of splitting too early. I read the book last week and our team is now slicing pie using this model. Thanks a lot. Troy Westley, CEO CareMonkey.

  • John Warren

    Saw the video having run into (showstopper) issues with division of value in the past. This model is respectably comprehensive without being burdensome. I have bought the book and look forward to more insights through it.

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  • http://www.t2vc.com scott

    I really like the slicingpie approach as an angel investor I have just helped an early stage investor unwind their shareholding in an approach similar (less well developed) as slicingpie. Thanks for sharing your insights and methods it will save SO many early ventures. I will share the magic with my networks. Scott

    • Mike Moyer

      Thanks for your comment, Scott!

  • http://www.georgebailey.co.uk/ Will Young

    Thanks Mike, this is really useful. A friend in SF got us onto your book and it makes a lot of sense. Having this calculator helps bring the concept into reality really nicely. Thank you.

    • http://www.SlicingPie.com/ Mike Moyer

      Thanks Will! I’m glad you liked it. Be sure to thank your friend for me!

  • Corey Hubbard

    Great read!

  • David Worrell

    Great book… and a cool calculator too. You should be charging $500 bucks for this! The insight alone is worth ten times that.

    • http://www.SlicingPie.com/ Mike Moyer

      Hi David, I’m sure we can work something out….!

  • Carl Lewis

    Halfway done

  • http://geekfree.net/ Aaron

    great tool, saved me 90 minutes, thanks Mike!

    • http://www.SlicingPie.com/ Mike Moyer

      Glad you liked it!

  • Sonya Davis

    This is super helpful! Saves us a ton of time!

  • Nana

    Great book Mike, lifesaver!

  • Leigh Pember

    Hey Mike, this is a nice idea. But why is the WE day a Wednesday?

    • Leigh Pember

      Oh wait, I see the formula is taking the start date from C3…but I thought you explained that as the start date of the Grunt, not the company. With this method each employee would have a different WE making it hard to tally weekly hours put into the project. I am sure you have a reason

  • Siam Mosharraf Hossain

    Just loved it Mike. You are a visionary.

  • Septi Utami

    Dear Mr. Moyer i’ve read you’re free sample book but at some point i feel confused. because actually i found your theory when our business has started and the agreement has been made. but still thanks for your sharing Mr. Moyer

  • http://www.tapsmart.com Jonathan Bonnick

    My co-founder has suggested I make a loan to get our new company started, that will start to be returned once the company is trading profitably in 6-12 months. I’m unsure how to plug this into the calculator (versus a simple cash-for-equity deal). Any suggestions?

    • Kristopher Dick

      Loans are covered in the book. Ver 2.3 of the Paperback edition: page 75 (Chapter 3: Creating a Grunt Fund, Section Heading: Loans and Credit). You may expect your principle + agreed upon interest, but no pie unless something goes awry.

  • Patricia O’Sullivan

    I have mentored many tens of entrepreneurs where this spreadsheet might have saved their company when the inevitable fall-out over something unforeseen happened. I will be encouraging every entrepreneur I know to read the Slicing Pie book and at the very least use this spreadsheet. As for myself, I will be signing up for the new Slicing Pie app :)

  • reastes

    I saw Mike present this in Brisbane last week. This is one of the most exciting entrepreneur tools I’ve seen in the last 10 years. Careful thought has gone into executing this. I won’t start another business without it.

  • Kent Harrington

    Just listened to the book on a drive from Houston to Baton Rogue and back, life saver!!

    • http://www.SlicingPie.com/ Mike Moyer

      Great! Say “hi,” to Houston for me!

      • Kent Harrington

        Will do, though the heat and humidity are brutal these days. I just finished briefing my starting team on the Pie Slicing and showed the chart. All have completely bought into, thanks Mike!!

  • https://www.facebook.com/kirk.booher Kirk aka OnGuardman


    I have been contemplating similar ideas and really look forward to combining with this concept and calculator. I have a couple questions,

    1) my company is 4.5 years old and I am considering creating phantom stock in order to attract and retain key team members and possibly real equity for a possible investor to help take the company to a better place. We are no longer a start up toddler but I would say a tween as far as maturity. I can’t think of any reason Slicing Pie wouldn’t work, can you?

    2) I would take the value it currently is (with the council of a few wise people) and move forward at that point. I think I would reduce the risk some due to the fact we are no longer a start up. I am purchasing the book but curious on your take if that’s not in there (value is profit x 5, contract street value of accounts under agreements – monitored alarm accounts accounts, and street wholesale value of inventory and other assets – any debt). Does that sound reasonable? Any suggestions for a smaller but stable company like mine?

    3) I was thinking about offering phantom stock small percentage to a Board and business advisers in lieu of fees (acct, lawyer, bus coach, etc), allow employees to convert performance bonus or deferred salary into the Pie as you mention, and investor. I really like the concepts outlined. Any issues between phantom and real stock? I am 100% owner and not wanting to mess with real stock shares quite yet but sometime? How does that affect the Pie?

    Thanks in advance

    • http://www.SlicingPie.com/ Mike Moyer

      Hi Kirk,

      Thanks for the note. Slicing Pie is mostly for bootstrapped startups. It’s based on individual risk. In more established companies individual risk isn’t taken because people are usually getting paid their fair market rates. In these cases equity is more about bonus and retention programs. A more traditional stock option or phantom stock program might work better. I’m working on a book about bonus programs, but it’s still rough!

  • Desirae Aguirre

    Hi Mike – Loved your book! Very new to the start-up business and I need some clarification.

    I am the founder of a start-up. Prior to reading your book I hired two developers. The arrangement we made was that I would pay them their fair value wage of $200 an hour however, half would be paid in cash the other would be in units of shares. How would this be inputted using your pie slicer techniques? I would hate to go back and renegotiate our terms as we all have a trusting and great relationship but I also don’t want this agreement to haunt me, so if I am wayyyyy off the mark, can you suggest an alternative solution?

    • http://www.SlicingPie.com/ Mike Moyer

      Hi Desirae,

      To use the Pie Slicer, you would simply input the unpaid portion of their rate. In your case, you would enter $100 which would convert to 200 slices per hour.

      You may be overpaying them unless they are some amazing developers. You’re paying them a $400,000 annual salary. Seems high. This is strictly a contractor rate so you should negotiate a buyout with them instead of equity. An outline for doing this is in the book.

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